Table of contents

ABOUT THE ART

HEAD OF A WOMAN,
circa 1650—1700, by Anonymous. French. Black chalk on grey paper.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
NUBIAN TRIBUTE PRESENTED TO THE KING, TOMB OF HUY, circa 1353-1327 BCE.
Egyptian. Tempera facsimile by
Charles K. Wilkinson, circa 1923-27.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
NEBAMUN SUPERVISING ESTATE ACTIVITIES, TOMB OF NEBAMUN, cica 1400-1352 BCE.
Egyptian. Tempera fascimile by
Charles K. Wilkinson, circa 1928.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
PANEL WITH STRIDING LION, circa
604–562 BCE. Babylonian from Mesopotamia (Modern Hillah). Glazed ceramic.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
THE THIRD ICHIKAWA YAOZŌ AS A DAIMYO STANDING UNDER A MAPLE TREE,
circa 1783, by Katsukawa Shunshō.
Japanese. Woodblock print on paper.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
THE FIRST NAKAMURA NAKAZO AS A
SAMURAI STANDING NEAR A
WILLOW TREE, 1768 or 1769,
by Katsukawa Shunshō. Japanese.
Woodblock print on paper.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
KABUKI ACTOR ICHIKAWA DANJŪRŌ V, 1774, by Katsukawa Shunshō. Japanese.
Woodblock print on paper.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
ADOLESCENCE, OR SISTERS,
1976, by Daphne Odjig. Canadian.
Acrylic on Canvas.
Private collection.
BROKEN EGGS,
1756, by Jean-Baptiste Greuze.
French. Oil on canvas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
THE FOREST AT PONTAUBERT,
1881, by Georges Seurat. French.
Oil on canvas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
WESTERN FOREST,
circa 1931, by Emily Carr.
Canadian. Oil on canvas.
Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto.
THE SUPPER AT EMMAUS, 1601,
by Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio.
Italian. Oil and tempera on canvas.
National Gallery, London.
DER SCHREI DER NATUR (THE SCREAM),
circa 1893, by Edvard Munch. Norwegian. Tempera and crayon on cardboard.
National Museum, Oslo.
REGATTA AT SAINTE-ADRESSE,
1867, by Claude Monet.
French. Oil on canvas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
BRIDGE OVER A POND OF WATER LILIES,
1899, by Claude Monet. French. Oil on canvas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
APPROACH TO VENICE,
1844, by J.M.W. Turner.
British. Oil on canvas.
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.
NATURALEZA MUERTA / STILL LIFE, 1908, by Diego Rivera. Mexican. Oil on canvas.
Government of the State of Veracruz, Xalapa, Mexico.
STILL LIFE WITH ONIONS, JUG AND FRUIT, circa 1930-38, by William H. Johnson. American. Oil on burlap.
Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Washington, DC.
THE PEPPERMINT BOTTLE,
1893/95, by Paul Cézanne.
French. Oil on canvas.
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.
LITTLE GIRL IN A BLUE ARMCHAIR, 1878,
by Mary Cassatt. American. Oil on canvas.
National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC.
GIRL IN A GREEN DRESS,
1930, by William H. Johnson.
American. Oil on canvas.
Smithsonian American Art Museum,
Washington, DC.
PORTRAIT OF A YOUNG WOMAN,
late 18th century, unknown artist. Pastel.
Saint Louis Art Museum, Saint Louis.
WATER-MOON AVALOKITESHVARA,
first half of 14th century, unidentified
artist. Korean. Hanging scroll,
ink and color on silk.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
THE SINGER IN GREEN,
circa 1884, by Edgar Degas.
French. Pastel on paper.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
A WOMAN SEATED BESIDE A VASE OF
FLOWERS, 1865, by Edgar Degas.
French. Oil on canvas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
DANCERS, PINK AND GREEN,
circa 1890, by Edgar Degas.
French. Oil on canvas.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.
TWO DANCERS AT REST OR, DANCERS
IN BLUE, circa 1898, by Edgar Degas.
French. Pastel on paper.
Musée d’Orsay, Paris.
UNDER THE WAVE OFF KANAGAWA OR, THE GREAT WAVE, circa 1830-32, by Katsushika Hokusai. Japanese. Woodblock print.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

Description

A little girl becomes bored and cranky during a visit to an art museum until she begins to identify with details in the paintings, which suddenly seem to come alive. To learn more about this publisher, click here: http://bit. ly/18XhmXr

Awards

  • Joint winner, The Years Best List, Resource Links 2020
  • Joint winner, Foreword INDIES Book Awards 2019
  • Commended, Purple Dragonfly Book Award, Honorable Mention: Picture Book 2019
  • Joint winner, Best Bets List, Top Ten, Ontario Library Association 2019
  • Short-listed, The da Vinci Eye, Eric Hoffer Book Awards 2019
  • Joint winner, Purple Dragonfly Book Award, Arts/Music 2019
  • Joint winner, Best Books for Kids & Teens, Canadian Children’s Book Centre 2019
  • Short-listed, Next Generation Indie Book Award 2019

Reviews

“Each page is filled with motion and emotion, as well as with Crump’s impressive recreations of numerous great works of art. ” 

- Atlantic Books Today, Winter/18

“The subtle and clever illustrations blend Anna’s life and famous works of art together, mirroring each other—something that children and adults will appreciate as they read. ” 

- I Heart Literacy, 08/28/18

“Art truly is for everybody in this charming book . . . The attention to detail is sublime as Crump’s gorgeous characters and scenery work to mirror the featured pieces on the wall that span centuries and cross oceans . . .   Anna at the Art Museum would be a great book to read before visiting a museum, to prepare children and manage expectations, but truly it is a good book to read any time. ” 

- CM reviews, *starred review, 12/21/18

“So charming and so real . . . a worthwhile addition to home, classroom and school libraries. ”

- CanLit for Little Canadians, 09/05/18

“Lively and expressive, the digital pictures complement the empathetic, well-structured story, but it’s the visual interplay between illustrated characters and museum art that makes this such an engaging, enjoyable picture book. ” 

- Booklist, 09/01/18

“The perfect prelude to a child’s first visit to an art museum. ” 

- Learning Magazine, 07/23/19

“Connection is at the heart of this story and those connections are shown with joy and understanding. ” 

- Sal’s Fiction Addiction, 11/18/18

“Clever and endearing. ” 

- Kirkus Reviews, *starred review, 05/23/18

“Lil Crump’s illustrations are a delight. Each scene is filled with visual jokes that reward careful attention. ” 

- The Booklist Reader, 01/23/19

“This book couldn’t have had a better ending. ”

- Long and Short Reviews, 01/10/2020