Turning Conflict Into Profit

A Roadmap for Resolving Personal and Organizational Disputes

La description

Conflict in the workplace becomes expensive when an organization?s efficiency is damaged by friction between employees. Conflicts can threaten the profitability and innovation of business, the sustainability of public institutions, and the health and achievement of individuals.

Faced with conflict most people either lean away, avoiding the issue, or charge right in, escalating the problem. Neither strategy is ultimately successful and the social and financial costs can be devastating.

Drawing on principles of psychology and sociology, Larry Axelrod and Roy Johnson have developed a new alternative for workplace conflict resolution. Turning Conflict Into Profit explains how ?leaning into conflict? not only defuses workplace tensions but releases blocked energy into positive channels of development. Written in plain language, with real-life examples, Turning Conflict Into Profit offers a practical and rewarding roadmap through conflict.

Reviews

"Eradicating conflict isn't the goal, Johnson said. Instead, the aim is to teach employees and their managers how to handle conflicts that inevitably happen in the workplace. When conflicts are handled well, they can lead to better employee health, co-operation and loyalty, which in turn leads to improved efficiency, creativity and profitability, Axelrod and Johnson write in their book. " The Edmonton Journal, November 24, 2006

"Eradicating conflict isn't the goal, Johnson said. Instead, the aim is to teach employees and their managers how to handle the conflicts that inevitably happen in the workplace. When conflicts are handled well, they can lead to better employee health, co-operation and loyalty, which in turn leads to improved efficiency, creativity and profitability, Axelrod and Johnson write in their book. " Wendy McClellan, The Province (Vancouver), September 11, 2005

"Chapters discuss the psychology of conflict, differences in conflict that arises from interpersonal issues as opposed to cultural issues, and offer a five-step process to turn conflict into benefit: tap the energy, find the learning, build relationships, cultivate innovation, make better decisions, and more. ...Overall, Turning Conflict into Profit is a valuable manual filled with insight and practical advice recommended especially for readers with little background in psychology - or in the art of mediating heated tempers. " Midwest Book Review, Fall 2005

"This book sets out pragmatic solutions which can be applied by lawyers and other professionals who deal with workplace abuses. It supplies practical alternatives to taking claims to litigation. The examples given are written in popular language. A useful book for the trial lawyer trying workplace claims. " Ronald F. MacIsaac, the Verdict, Issue 106, October 2005

"I'm using it in my undergrad Social Conflict and Conflict Resolution class as a first text (followed by Pruitt and Kim), and in my graduate fieldwork course as a way into thinking through effective work in groups and organizations. It's easy to read, clear, insightful, and grounded in social psychology with useful references to literature that I recognize. " Dr. J. Newton, Professor, Psychology Department, San Francisco State University.

"This book sets out pragmatic solutions that can be applied by lawyers and other professionals who deal with workplace abuses. It supplies practical alternatives to taking claims to litigation. The examples given are written in popular language. A useful book for the trial lawyer trying workplace claims. " Ronald F. MacIsaac, Book Reviews, Issue No. 77, September, 2005

"The authors provide techniques to help readers "lean into" the conflict as opposed to charging or avoiding. Case studies from the health-care, corporate, and community sectors are provided as teaching tools for each step, along with chapter summaries. " Louise Karch, Canadian Book Review Annual, 2006

"Turning Conflict describes many instances of workplace conflict, and tries to show, contrary to conventional wisdom, they don't produce tougher, fitter workers: They produce losers, and the biggest loser is often the company. ..To escape what Axelrod and Johnson (senior executives in The Neutral Zone, a human-resources consultancy) refer to as 'the conflict trap,' takes 'curiosity and courage,' to move through 'the narrow place' and on to 'the profit track. '" John Simpson, The National Post, Nov 2, 2005

"This sounds like wisdom we all could use. " Rebecca Wigod, Vancouver SUN, Saturday Books section, July 16, 2005