Driven Apart

Women's Employment Equality and Child Care in Canadian Public Policy

Par (auteur) Annis May Timpson
Éditeur: UBC Press
Hardcover : 9780774808200, 336 pages, Février 2001

Table des matières

Tables

Preface

Acknowledgments

Abbreviations

1. The Double-Edged Nature of Women's Employment Inequality

2. Citizenship, Motherhood, and Employment in the Wartime and Welfare States

3. The Royal Commission on the Status of Women

4. A Just Society? The Trudeau Government’s Response to the Royal Commission on the Status of Women

5. Redefining the Issues: Systemic Discrimination and National Child Care Policies in Trudeau’s Final Term

6. The Royal Commission on Equality in Employment

7. Breaking the Links: The Mulroney Government’s Response to the Royal Commission on Equality in Employment

8. Tiny Timid Steps: Employment Equity and Child Care in Mulroney’s Second Term

9. Creating Opportunity? The Chrétien Government’s Approach to Employment Equity and Child Care

10. Linked Together, Yet Driven Apart

Appendices

A. Research Interviews

B. Turning Points in Canadian Policy Development on Women's Employment Equality and Child Care

Notes

Bibliography

Index

La description

Annis May Timpson demonstrates how Canadian women’s calls for
family-friendly employment policies have translated into inaction or
inappropriate action on the part of successive federal governments. She
focuses on debates, public inquiries, and policy evolution during the
Trudeau, Mulroney, and Chrétien eras, contextualizing these
developments with a discussion of the changing patterns of women’s
employment since the Second World War. Drawing on a wealth of
interviews and close analysis of primary documents, Driven
Apart explains why federal governments have been able to implement
employment equity policies but have failed to develop a national system
of child care. Driven Apart was selected as an Outstanding
Academic Title by CHOICE and was awarded The Pierre Savard Prize by the
International Council for Canadian Studies.

Récompenses

  • Winner, Outstanding Academic Title, Choice Magazine 2002
  • Winner, Pierre Savard Prize, International Council for Canadian Studies 2002
  • Winner, CWSA Book Prize, Canadian Women's Studies Association 2002

Reviews

[A] meticulously researched and engagingly written book . .. Those interested in Canadian politics and administration should find this book as illuminating as those interested in employment policy and in policy issues differentially affecting women.

- C. Shrewsbury