La description

In a quiet village in Czechoslovakia, laws restricted the freedom of Jewish people during WWII. A small plot of land by the river was allocated to the village’s Jewish youth, and it was here that some brave young people decided to create a newspaper.

Reviews

Copies of the original editions and black-and-white photos salvaged from the war add to this incredible piece of Holocaust history.

- Kirkus Reviews

A rich assortment of photographs and maps helps young readers connect with the people and places described in the book.

- Professionally Speaking (Ontario College of Teachers)

Kacer makes these children come alive, leading her readers into the story as if it were a novel, while commemorating the lives of the kids.

- The Toronto Star

This story is well-written and interesting, and meets the equity test.

- Voice (Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario)

The book can also be an inspiration for children about how the human spirit can triumph over adversity.

- CM Magazine

We need a book like this that reminds us there is always hope and the human spirit will always survive.

- Lethbridge Herald

The simple yet poignant style holds your attention.

- Association of Jewish Libraries

Readers will gain knowledge of the events that occurred during the beginning of World War II through the eyes of ordinary people.

- Resource Links

Interspersed with black-and-white photographs, stories and artwork from the newspapers is a riveting story of courage.

- Jewish Book World

The undying spirit of the Jewish people during those dreadful times is emphasized, and descriptions of life in the camps are excellent.

- VOYA

The Underground Reporters is an amazing story about survival, rather than death.

- Jewish Independent Online

Historical settings are well researched and vivid…characters and plot are at the forefront.

- CCL

Kacer's taut recounting of the grim background story highlights the brave gallantry of the children.

- City Parent