Table of contents

 

Foreword
Robert Bothwell
Preface

Book One

Dominican Republic
Voyage to a Different Planet
Leopold?s List
Darkness at Noon
The Dictator?s Sarcophagus
"Down with Those Who Rise"
Navidad con Libertad
Meatballs, Moose Piss, and the National Day

Cuba
Whose Man in Havana?

United Kingdom
The Thames, Bunnies, and Bicycles

Japan
Sake and the Advancement of Cultural Diplomacy

Guyana
Caviar and Christmas Trees
The Phantom Saboteur
Alcide
Three–Piece
"Will the Dynamite Explode if I . . . "
The State Funeral of the Honourable Linden Forbes Burnham

Suriname
Clothes Make the Man
Jewels of the Forest

Trinidad and Tobago
Me, Mick Jagger, Jungle Fever, and the Legion of Evil

Grenada
Pierre Trudeau and the Embarrassment of a Full Scale American War against a Very Small Island

Haiti
Le Chie est Mort

Central America and Columbia
Go By Boat: Travels with Allan MacEachen

Panama
The General and Margot Fonteyn

Central America
Fireworks and Foreign Policy

Venezuela, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic
A is for Aristide
Between Brazil and Venezuela: Caipirinhas, Trestle Bridges, and Formula One Bus Drivers
Beauty and the Official Beast: The Miss Venezuela Contest

Book Two

Dominican Republic
Stepping Back from the Precipice

Haiti
"The Pencil of God Has No Eraser" I
"The Pencil of God Has No Eraser&quot II

Bosnia
Black Past, Grey Future?
Sex, Sports, and Diplomacy
The Psychologist, the General, and the Beauty Contest
More Generals and the Ice Cream Man
The Road to Srebrenica

Paraguay
El Supremo

Kyrgyzstan
Boiling Toilets and Fermented Mare?s Milk

Guatemala
San Marcos and the Elections of 2003

Venezuela
Hugo Chavez: Much Loved, Much Loathed

Ukraine
Night train to Ternopil

Palestine
Good Elections, Bad Judgement

Nicaragua
The Jaguar Changes Some of Its Spots

El Salvador
Off the Beaten Track

Haiti
Goudeau–Goudeau: Return to Haiti
Lou Quinn: A Profile

Afterward
Notes
Index

Description

John W. Graham never imagined that his apprenticeship in the Canadian Foreign Service would have him stationed in Cuba covertly monitoring Soviet military operations on behalf of the CIA. Other assignments, both as a Canadian diplomat and as a member of international organizations proved also to be unexpected and bizarrely entertaining. Whose Man in Havana? examines the lighter and human side of diplomacy, but almost everywhere the dark side intrudes. The intersection of both is black comedy, and there is much of that—often woven around critical policy analysis. Although the book is focused mainly on Latin America and the Caribbean, it ranges across Bosnia, the UK, Ukraine, Japan, and Kyrgyzstan.